March 6, 2019

Episode 406: Body Double (1984)

Special Guests: Robert J. Avrech, Gregg Henry
Guest Co-Hosts: Bill Ackerman, Jim Vendiola

Brian De Palma’s 1984 film, Body Double  stars Craig Wasson as Jake Scully, an actor in a low budget vampire film. After a terrifying bout of claustrophobia he loses his job, his girl, and his home until fellow actor, Sam Bouchard (Gregg Henry) does Jake a favor by letting him apartment-sit at a posh pad. As an added bonus, there’s a woman across the way who performs a nightly ritual of self-pleasure and, well, Jake likes to watch. But, of course, things aren’t always what they seem in Hollywood.

Jim Vendiola and Bill Ackerman join Mike to discuss this mash-up of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo and Rear Window. Screenwriter and actor Gregg Henry talk about the behind-the-scenes of De Palma's exploration of voyeurism.

Listen/Download Now:

Links:
Buy Body Double on Blu-Ray
Buy Double De Palma by Susan Dworkin
Buy De Palma on Blu-Ray
Visit the official Annette Haven website
Read Body Double: why Brian De Palma's pornographic fiasco is worth another peek
Read De Palma Does Hollywood by Travis Woods
Read Brian De Palma’s ‘Body Double’: A Hitchcockian Thriller Executed in Completely Original Style
Read more about Pehla Nasha (1993)
Read the story about Craig Wasson on Bitchy Actress's blog
Listen to our Vertigo episode
Listen to our Blow Out episode

Music:
Original Soundtrack by Pino Donnagio
"Mr. Zero Ban Gaya Hero" - Vinod Rathod
"Relax" - Frankie Goes to Hollywood

Watch:








1 comment:

  1. The variant of the story I learned, and which I commented upon in the synopses of the explicit movies featuring Annette Haven which I showed at the Twisted Spoke tavern was that Columbia threatened to drop its distribution of the movie if Annette Haven was the “star” hereof.
    Without a major studio boosting its distribution in the U.S.A. {but note that this was about the time when home distribution on Beta and VHS was blooming}, theatrical presentations would have been sparse. So Annette Haven's role was scaled down to cameo-level. For her, she chose to not stridently disparage her redefined role in the movie.
    For me, this is the first moment of the clampdown. Mainstream “Hollywood” movies could have moved into the explicit category. But this episode revealed that it would not. |=(}

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